Schedule: With Times

It is only two months until the symposium! Registration is now closed; we have reached the maximum number of participants I think can be comfortably accommodated. Put your name on the waiting list in case of drop outs!

Here is the running time on the day. You will see it is a tight schedule! As it’s all in the same place, I’ve opted to make the breaks fairly short (since you don’t have to walk anywhere for lunch!), as that means the day will finish by six for those of you who need to get home that evening. For those who don’t, a casual conference dinner plan is in the works.

The following programme will of course probably be subject to the last-minute changes usual at any conference…

Please note, because of our very full schedule, papers are restricted to 15 minutes in length. I will be asking chairs to be strict with speakers on this! The roundtable papers will last approximately ten minutes each.

LOCATION:

Seminar Room, TORCH, Radcliffe Humanities, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG, with refreshments in the Common Room.

9.15 – 9.30: REGISTRATION 

9.30 – 9.45: WELCOME

9.45 – 10.45: PLENARY PAPER:

David Clark: What’s Love Got to Do with It? Homosocial Desire, Scholarship, and the Impossibility of Friendship

10.45 – 11.00: COFFEE

11 – 12.30: SESSION 1 : STORIES: Homosocial Narratives and Images

Amanda Hannoosh Steinberg: Female Homosociality in Medieval Arabic Epic: Dangerous Ties

Androniki Dialeti: Words of Love, Seas of Blood: Male Homosociality, War and Piety in the Construction of Lepanto as a Christian Victory (1571)

Natasha Morris: Coffee House Heroes: Images, Homosocial Space and the Articulation of Masculine Archetype in Qajar Iran

Greg Salter: Gilbert And George, Homosociality, and the Postwar Reconstruction of Home

12.30 – 1.15: LUNCH

1.15 – 2.45: SESSION 2: SCHOOLED: Homosocial Institutions

Robert Grout: Developing Homosociality: Inclusion, exclusion and violence in late-medieval grammar schools

Emily Rutherford: Defenders of Male Homosociality in Early-Twentieth-Century Oxbridge

Emma Lundin: Double militancy and fifth columns: Women’s homosocial organisations within political parties

James Southern: “No Homosexuals Allowed”: Homosociality in the British Diplomatic Service, 1965-1995

2.45 – 3.00: COFFEE

3 – 4.30: SESSION 3: SEX: Homosocial Sexualities

Nailya Shamgunova: Anglophone conceptualisations of sexual diversity in the Ottoman Empire, c. 1550 – 1700

Seth Stein LeJacq: Between Men, Between Decks: Homosociality, Intimacy, and Sex in the Georgian Royal Navy

Chase Gregory: Living With, Living As: Robert Reid-Pharr’s Lesbianism

Daniel Laurin: An Eroticized Homosociality: Camaraderie, Horseplay and ‘Authentic’ Pleasure in Straight-Guy Porn

4.30 – 4.45: SHORT BREAK 

4.45 – 5.45: ROUNDTABLE: YESTERDAY, NOW, TOMORROW: History, Homosociality and the Hereafter

Short papers by: Patricia Cullum (Celibacy, separate spheres and the troll in the basement: Continuity and change in the formation and expression of homosociality), Huw Griffiths (Male Friendship Adapted in Eighteenth-Century Drama) and Jenny Hoogewerf-McComb (Ending Rape On Campus: 1264-2017), before an open discussion on the roundtable theme.

5.45 – 6.00: CLOSING REMARKS

APPROX 7.00: DINNER, TBC

Registration Open

Dear friends, you may now register for Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time on Monday 19 June, at Oxford’s Radcliffe Humanities Building. As the symposium is entirely FREE, the easiest way to sort registration is a simple google form. So please sign up here.

Please note that places at the symposium are limited. So if you find after signing up that you are no longer able to attend, please let us know ASAP at beyondbetweenmen@gmail.com.

We’ll be sending out information soon with helpful information about local accommodation, travel etc, though if you want to get a head start on booking accommodation, start here. Times on the day itself are still to be finalised, but the day is likely to start with registration at 9am and finish up around 6pm, followed by an optional dinner (that you do have to pay for, sadly) around 7pm. So it is going to be a fairly packed day, but an exciting one!

If you have any questions, do get in touch at beyondbetweenmen@gmail.com.

 

 

BEYOND BETWEEN MEN: DRAFT PROGRAMME

PLENARY PAPER:

David Clark: What’s Love Got to Do with It? Homosocial Desire, Scholarship, and the Impossibility of Friendship

SESSION 1 : STORIES: Homosocial Narratives and Images

Amanda Hannoosh Steinberg: Female Homosociality in Medieval Arabic Epic: Dangerous Ties

Androniki Dialeti: Words of Love, Seas of Blood: Male Homosociality, War and Piety in the Construction of Lepanto as a Christian Victory (1571)

Natasha Morris: Coffee House Heroes: Images, Homosocial Space and the Articulation of Masculine Archetype in Qajar Iran

Greg Salter: Gilbert And George, Homosociality, and the Postwar Reconstruction of Home

SESSION 2: SCHOOLED: Homosocial Institutions

Robert Grout: Developing Homosociality: Inclusion, exclusion and violence in late-medieval grammar schools

Emily Rutherford: Defenders of Male Homosociality in Early-Twentieth-Century Oxbridge

Emma Lundin: Double militancy and fifth columns: Women’s homosocial organisations within political parties

James Southern: “No Homosexuals Allowed”: Homosociality in the British Diplomatic Service, 1965-1995

SESSION 3: SEX: Homosocial Sexualities

Nailya Shamgunova: Anglophone conceptualisations of sexual diversity in the Ottoman Empire, c. 1550 – 1700

Seth Stein LeJacq: Between Men, Between Decks: Homosociality, Intimacy, and Sex in the Georgian Royal Navy

Chase Gregory: Living With, Living As: Robert Reid-Pharr’s Lesbianism

Daniel Laurin: An Eroticized Homosociality: Camaraderie, Horseplay and ‘Authentic’ Pleasure in Straight-Guy Porn

ROUNDTABLE: YESTERDAY, NOW, TOMORROW: History, Homosociality and the Hereafter

Short papers by: Patricia Cullum (Celibacy, separate spheres and the troll in the basement: Continuity and change in the formation and expression of homosociality), Huw Griffiths (Male Friendship Adapted in Eighteenth-Century Drama) and Jenny Hoogewerf-McComb (Ending Rape On Campus: 1264-2017), before an open discussion on the roundtable theme.

NOTES:

This is an early iteration of the final programme, excluding scheduling details and of course subject to last minute title changes etc. But these are the accepted papers and you can get a sense of the shape the symposium is forming. It was a difficult decision whittling down the many abstracts I received. After a good deal of thought I decided to run four-paper sessions rather than the more typical three; this makes for a slightly more hectic day, but there was so much good scholarship on offer, it seemed silly to turn more of it down than I needed to! In terms of diversity, we have a pretty even split of male and female scholars, and for the purposes of parity I’ve chosen to exclude institutions and professional status from this draft programme so that your eye will be drawn to the titles, not to the Ivy League or professorial status. However, more than a quarter of our speakers are early career scholars; I will be doing my best to secure funding to make their presence at the symposium easier. I received far more papers on male Western homosociality post-1800 than anything else (which is a lesson to me to better extend the reach of my CFP next time), but I have tried to create a programme that represents a little more of the world and its history.

None of this is a call for praise; these efforts are the bare minimum we should expect of conference organisers, but I am making these notes public – and will continue to report on the make up of the conference and the rationale behind it – in order to encourage other organisers to do the same, and to engage in discussion about why their conferences look the way they do. This symposium is intended as the beginning of a conversation that I hope will continue in an edited collection with scope for a wider range of chapters; and I am beginning to work on ways we could continue this work in a more formalised research network. I will be reaching out to you all to help me make this ongoing work a project that represents both diverse research and diverse researchers.

Rachel Moss (@menysnoweballes)

 

Abstract deadline has passed

The call for papers for Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time has now closed. I’ve had a lot of submissions – around three times as many papers as can actually be included! – and will have a challenging but interesting time deciding not only which papers are best, but also which papers best complement one another. I want this to be a day of fruitful discussion, and so will be putting together panels that will hopefully provoke much conversation. I will let all applicants know as soon as possible if their papers will be included. Thank you if you submitted!

FREE registration & travel grants!

Great news for attendees of Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time! With the support of the History Faculty, the University of Oxford, registration for this one day event (including sandwich lunch and tea/coffee) will be entirely free. (You will also have the option to sign up for a conference dinner, which unfortunately will cost something – but the day itself will have no charge.)

I will also have some funds available to help postgraduate, ECR, and unemployed speakers attend the conference. Details about that will be confirmed nearer the time.

We have already received a number of great abstracts, ranging in time period from the Middle Ages through to World War II, and from scholars in art history, history and literary studies. Please continue to submit abstracts – the deadline is February 27th.

 

CFP: Beyond Between Men, 19 June 2017

Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time

University of Oxford, Monday 19 June 2017

Since the publication of Eve Sedgwick’s groundbreaking 1985 work Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire, ‘homosociality’ has become a regularly-used shorthand term for social bonds between persons of the same gender, and for the hegemonic norms that result from those social bonds. Despite this, academic discourse on homosociality in its historic context is surprisingly underdeveloped. Homosocial relationships and spaces do not just naturally manifest: they must be introduced, maintained, and developed in a variety of social contexts. That it is often assumed that homosociality simply ‘happens’ is a result of the internalisation of the cultural discourse that makes gender solidarity – in its most basic form, needing ‘girl time’ or ‘guy time’ – seem obvious and natural, when in fact promoting and maintaining (and in rarer contexts, deliberately dismantling) homosocial relationships and spaces requires sustained work on individual and collective levels. This one day symposium aims to bring together scholars of all periods of history and from different disciplines to discuss what homosociality means and what its study contributes to our understanding of the past.

Our plenary speaker is Dr David Clark, Associate Professor at the University of Leicester and author of the influential Between Medieval Men: Male Friendship and Desire in Early Medieval English Literature (2009).

We are seeking abstracts of approximately 100 words for papers of no more than twenty minutes in length. Submissions are sought from academics across the humanities and with any period of specialism from antiquity to the modern day. We intend that a selection of the conference papers will be published as a collection at a later date, though submitting your abstract does not commit you to this further project.

This conference is organised with the support of the History Faculty at the University of Oxford, TORCH (The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities), and the Leverhulme Trust. Please submit abstracts to, or make enquiries at, beyondbetweenmen@gmail.com. Closing date for submission of abstracts is Monday 27 February.

Keep up to date with symposium developments by reading this site and following twitter updates by conference organiser Dr Rachel Moss @menysnoweballes.

Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time

Announcing Beyond Between Men: Homosociality Across Time, a symposium to be held at the University of Oxford on Monday, 19 June 2017.

Despite Eve Sedgwick’s groundbreaking 1985 work Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire, academic discourse on homosociality in its historic context is surprisingly underdeveloped, even though scholars readily use it as a shorthand term for social bonds between persons of the same gender, and for the hegemonic norms that result from those social bonds. Homosocial relationships and spaces do not, however, just naturally manifest: they must be introduced, maintained, and developed in a variety of social contexts. That it is often assumed that homosociality simply happens is a result of the internalisation of the cultural discourse that makes gender solidarity – in its most basic form, needing ‘girl time’ or ‘guy time’ – seem obvious and natural, when in fact promoting and maintaining (and in rarer contexts, deliberately dismantling) homosocial relationships and spaces requires sustained work on individual and collective levels. This one day symposium aims to bring together scholars of all periods of history and from different disciplines to discuss what homosociality means and what its study contributes to our understanding of the past.

Plenary speaker: Dr David Clark, Associate Professor at the University of Leicester, author of Between Medieval Men: Male Friendship and Desire in Early Medieval English Literature (“a smart, elegant and ambitious survey”, Time Higher Education).

Organiser: Dr Rachel Moss, currently working on the Leverhulme Trust-funded project Beyond Between Men: The Medieval Homosocial Imagination, and author of Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts.

An official CFP will be put out in January; in the meantime, feel free to contact beyondbetweenmen@gmail.com for details.

This conference will be supported by the Faculty of History at the University of Oxford and by the Leverhulme Trust.

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